Posts Tagged ‘InGen’

 

 

First I want to start off this blog post by saying that I am in no way an “insider,” or know really anything about anything. I’m a die hard fan of Jurassic Park (big shocker there,) and Universal theme parks in general. I can only speak on behalf of the experiences I’ve had, what I’ve read in articles as well as other postings online, and also from what I’ve heard from interviews. I’m just a nerd, with big thoughts and big questions.  Also, for a majority of this post I’ll be talking mainly about Universal Orlando although it does not totally negate the dynamic of Jurassic Park at Universal Hollywood.

Secondly, I’ll start with this:

 

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I received this letter… oh, back in 2004 when I was 12 years old. A little bit of context to the letter: in 2003 my family surprised me with a trip to Universal Orlando for my birthday. This was a BIG deal. Literally ever since I knew that Universal Hollywood had a Jurassic Park ride I had wanted to go. When Orlando announced Islands of Adventure and their Jurassic Park island (called Isla Adventura for those who are wondering) I was dead set on going at some point in my life. The problem was a trip like that is that it’s obviously expensive and I was never sure I was going to be able to go. Then came my 12th birthday and my parents absolutely shocked me when I was handed the plane tickets for our Florida getaway.

That trip in and of itself is an entire grand memory and filled with stories I may sometime divulge. But for now all you need to know is a few things:

  • From that moment on Universal was set in stone as my theme park destination of choice
  • Jurassic Park awed me
  • Not all of the Jurassic Park area was open.

You see, unbeknown to us at the time Universal had closed down both the bottom half of the Jurassic Park Discovery Center, as well as their Triceratops Encounter. At this time Universa was working on that years Halloween Horror Nights, and they were using the Jurassic Park area for a zone and these specific areas for two houses- Jungle of Doom, and Psycho Scareapy.

Once I got home my first instinct was the write to Universal and tell them how amazing of a time I had (mind, this was the days before Twitter and other forms of social media like that.) In that letter I told them how much fun I had, as well as how much I hope to attend again in the future so that I could hopefully get the full experience (since two of the attractions were closed) as well as attend Halloween Horror Nights- which I very quickly became enamored with as well.

Months went by and I had all but forgotten about the letter, until the gem I posted above arrived at my house. I was so excited when I got this. Like, beyond excited. Not only was I getting a letter back from Universal directly, they were telling me special information about their Jurassic Park area. A new attraction was going to replace Triceratops Encounter? No way! While I always wanted to experience Trike Encounter, I couldn’t not be excited for the idea of the Jurassic area getting some new love! It had been two years since Jurassic Park 3 and this was right on the cusp of Jurassic 4 going in to perpetual limbo for a LONG time. I was excited.

But then years went by and… nothing happened. Nothing came of this “new” attraction, and Trike Encounter remained closed. So now not only were we not getting any new movies as the years passed,  but the Jurassic Park rides/areas at the Universal parks were seemingly getting little to no attention as well.

 

Then came 2009 and this is when I made my second trip to Universal. It was kind of an early high school graduation and birthday gift to myself. Not only would I be returning to the park, but I would be going to HHN for the first time that year as well.

Much like the first time I ever went I had an amazing time. Construction was just beginning on Hogsmeade and while I felt a little territorial about Harry Potter encroaching on the Jurassic area’s space- it looked awesome. This time I also got to experience the Discover Center in all its glory. But two things really were itching at me in my mind: one being that I just couldn’t understand why Trike Encounter was still closed if they planned on doing nothing with it. The second being, despite all my love for it and how technically amazing it still was… once I removed my rose colored glasses it was hard to deny that Jurassic Park River Adventure was aging. It had been around for over a decade now, and some aspects were just really not up to par with where you could tell they originally were. Slow mechanics, and several effects and dinosaurs not working at all. This caused me distress because I realized that the license I loved most just really was getting no attention or care for at all. Period. All around. Nobody seemed to care about Jurassic Park. I’ll hit more on this point later but just know that at the time, while I don’t mean for it to sound as overly dramatic as this does- it stung.

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Image from Behind the Gates

There was a final note though to this trip. Anybody who’s ever been on the River Adventure may recall a giant mockup of the island at the beginning of the ride. Each area is pointed out with a red tag. If you go to the back side of this island though you will see a red tag that reads “Jeep Safari.” Literally every other tag on this model corresponds to an area physically in the park… except this one. My first thought was that this had to have been the ride that was originally planned to replace Trike Encounter. But what happened to it? We’ll get to that later.

 

Hop forward to 2013. I am going to Universal in September of that year again for research concerning my senior thesis covering horror in theatre. To say that was all I was doing down there would be a downright lie because obviously I spent the days at the park, but at night I was doing “research” by attending HHN. By this point Hogsmeade had been opened, and literally a week after Jurassic Park 4 (before it was given the title Jurassic World) had been announced and had a release date. I was PUMPED. When I got to Universal it hadn’t seemed like a lot had changed in terms of their Jurassic area. And it wasn’t like I expected a complete overhaul overnight because of the new film. But I was excited for the future. I though “hey, this could really get things started” and JP could finally be getting some much needed love. The ride still was aging, and there seemed to be even more mechanical problems now than there was when I last went in 2009. The only thing that the JP area was getting that was new (at this time) was street games where you could win prizes, and they weren’t even operational yet.

Earlier in 2013 there was an official notice that went online for the JP ride going through refurbishments. While  it’s well known that many/all the rides go through yearly maintenance word of this spread like wildfire in the JP fan community, as everyone was expecting something big to happen with the newly announced Jurassic World AS WELL AS the fact that Jurassic Park was reaching 20 years old and Universal was re-releasing it on 3D. When the ride reopened though… nothing had changed. The animals got a few color tweaks on their skins, but that was it. Nothing majorly new had been done.

Then came 2015. Jurassic World was literally around the corner and… it seemed like Universal had nothing planned. While I still tend to think that Jurassic World had some fairly decent marketing, I do concede that it wasn’t as strong as it could have been and many fans though it was even less than that. Many felt that Universal was not pushing it as hard as they should have. Now I know everyone thinks their fandom or interest is special, and obviously I’m no different. Jurassic Park really helped shaped my life; my interests, creativity, goals- everything. So I wanted it to get the attention I thought it deserved. What I couldn’t (and still don’t) understand is why Universal seemingly couldn’t see it. Jurassic Park was, for the longest time, Universal’s highest grossing franchise and was only recently passed by the Fast and the Furious franchise (which I would like to point out only surpasses Jurassic by $300 mill, but has seven (soon to be eight) films. In other words Jurassic has done WAY more for Universal with less. ) And Universal is treating it like it’s this outsider property. The fourth film took more than a decade to develop, the rides at both parks have been slowly wearing down with only minor upkeep, and even with a new film finally underway it seemed like Universal wasn’t pushing it or doing anything exciting at their parks for it.

As the release of the new film crept closer everybody was surprised at the kind of presales Jurassic World was doing. A few weeks before the release of the film Universal Orlando surprises everyone with the opening of their Raptor Encounter (quickly followed by Universal Hollywood- both inspired by the “encounter” at Universal Singapore.) While it may not have been a new ride or anything many fans were excited to see Universal parks finally back in on Jurassic and hoped that it led to more soon.

Jurassic World released and smashed box office records just like the original film back in 1993. Nobody expected it to do that well, and many fans hoped that this would grab Universal’s attention. Yet there was seemingly nothing on the horizon. I made my fourth trip to Universal in September of 2015, and while the Raptor Encounter was everything I had hoped it would be, and I had an amazing time I couldn’t help but feel that there could be more. Why wasn’t Jurassic utilized at HHN (they don’t have to use the area at IoA, they could have just made a house)? Why wasn’t there any real updates to the ride, or elsewhere? Obviously there was tons of Jurassic World merch and signs, but… that was it. And there were no substantial news or new rumors anywhere that Universal had anything planned. Even with Universal Japan announcing that October they were going to build a new Jurassic themed roller coaster,  Universal stateside was mum on everything about the prehistoric franchise.

 

Now that I’ve recapped a lot of my personal park going timeline and experiences I’ll tack on some other info and rumors that have been long standing. Ever since 2010 (perhaps even before) there have been rumors of Isla Adventura/Jurassic Park being shut down and removed. I don’t know if there is any true substance to this, or if is just forum talk- but I’ve conversed with many who have suspected it. Jurassic Park was an expensive ride to build to begin with, and it has a lot to upkeep. There is a reason why not very many rides nowadays utilize animatronics and practical effects the way JP rides do and are now leaning more to “dark rides/screen rides”… their cheaper. Take Jurassic Park: The Ride’s $100 million price tag (and JUST for the ride mind you, that doesn’t even cover the rest of area) and compare that to the $256 million it cost to create the entirety of Hogsmeade. (that’s the Hogwarts ride, the area- everything.)  The thought was that Universal felt they were losing money in the JP area. By not having a new film or any new interest there was no point in the island. They could easily dismantle it and fit several cheaper rides in that area which would a.) bring in more guests, and b.) save them money in the long run.

A lot of fans have wondered why not just “fix” the problems with the River Adventure? Well, it kind of goes back to the price tag. The cost to completely rip out the existing mechanics of the current ride and replace them, or to add anything new is theorized by some to be “too much” for Universal. So while it’d be amazing for them to not only update their animatronics but perhaps update some of the dinos with more film accurate molds (I.E- like the stegos we see at Universal Singapore) overall it’d be easier  and more cost efficient to rip it all out and replace it with a newer, cheaper ride.

So why not replace it with a new Jurassic Park ride? Two theorized reasons:  One being contract stipulations with Spielberg possibly.  And two being that before 2015 Universal felt that there was no real interest in Jurassic Park as a brand anymore. No film, and not a lot of new merch meant that Jurassic Park was going extinct.

Now that there IS a new record breaking film (and let us not skim over the fact that the very limited 3D re-release of the original film tacked on an EXTRA $45 million)why don’t they build something new? And THAT dear readers is the ultimate question.  Luckily because I have nothing else to do with my free time, I have some thoughts on the matter.

 

 

The original ride, which first opened at Universal Hollywood took five years to develop and cost $100 million. That’s more than the actual movie itself. But the ride was a mega hit, and Universal quickly gravitated to copying and theming one of their islands at IoA around Jurassic Park. When IoA opened, once again Universal had a mega hit. Not only was there the ride but there was the Trike Encounter, the Discover Center, and Camp Jurassic with Pteronodon Flyers. Now, remember that little “Jeep Safari” tag on the model I mentioned earlier? Apparently it’s always been there.  Rumor has it that there was a “phase 2” prepared for the Jurassic Park area. In Jurassic World Claire Dearing says “The park needs a new attraction every few years in order to reinvigorate the public’s interest.” That was the idea here. Universal had plans on future rides happening because JP was so popular. The Lost World had just been released and there were already rumbles of Jurassic 3 in the near future. JP was a hot franchise. While spacing and land had always been an issue for Universal, they had specifically spaced out several parts to build on eventually.

Then11892202_1454710778189750_1240067115970479703_n came and went Jurassic Park 3, as well as all the plans Universal had for their Jeep Ride at the time. From what I’ve gathered it’s officially unknown as to exactly why it was fully scrapped but some theorize it was due to a number of reasons, the main one being that Universal feared that the Jeep Safari would have been too similar to Disney’s Countdown to Extinction/Dinosaur ride at Animal Kingdom.

Apart from the concept sketches of the ride not a lot is known about it other than the fact that it basically would have been a vehicle tour (like in the first film) that followed a similar plot to the River Adventure- everything is nice and calm until the final moments and you have to escape. A secondary theory I have about this ride pertains to another hidden Easter egg in the JP

Discovery Center. On the bottom floor there is a mural that crosses over the entire wall. On that mural (as well as the corresponding mural upstairs) every single species of dinosaur/prehistoric animal that is on there is represented… except for two.

One being these guys:

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Yeah. That’s right, Carnotaurus. Keep in mind that this area was being developed around the time that The Lost World was in production, and Michael Crichton’s book was being written. It’s long been thought that carnos were originally supposed to be in the film adaptation of TLW (like they were in the book) but were scrapped. My theory is Universal liked the animals, and wanted to use them in the Jeep ride eventually. But because a.) they weren’t in the films and b.) because of Disney’s use of those specific dinosaurs they didn’t use them.

 

The second animal not represented is this guy:

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Elasmosaurus. Not this is interesting because I’m not sure where it may have fit- but it’s a fun little find no matter what and makes me wonder if Universal had originally intended on having an animatronic Elasmo neck and head in their lagoon near JP.

All that being said, I want to give a shout out to current Universal character actors in the JP Discovery Center- I always ask them about these creatures and where they are in the park whenever I visit, and I always get really unique and interesting answers from each of them.

 

In-between the Jeep Safari being scrapped and 2013 there was rumors of another new ride being developed. It was supposed to take place in the mines on the island and while you were going about, raptors had also escaped and start attacking. Basically along the lines of The Mummy ride, but  Jurassic themed. Your cart would start in the open, then go through dark tunnels. During that transition though scratches and dents would appear on your6 cart after it had been in the dark or exposed to special kinds of light.

 

 

It’s also important to note that for a short span in the late ’00’s Universal reopened the Trike Encounter, but only seasonally- during the winter months.  They only did this for about two years though and then announced its closure forever.

Once Universal obtained the rights to create their Harry Potter world though is when a lot of fans of JP started becoming a little nervous. The new island would mean creeping in to some of the land that was specifically set aside for an addition to Jurassic Park and for many that signaled that perhaps Universal really didn’t care about Jurassic anymore. Slap on top the removal of one of JP’s main gates and the construction of Kong: Skull Island (which, oddly enough, is incredibly reminiscent of the scrapped Jeep Safari ride) fans were really starting to feel their paradise get smaller. No matter the fact that Kong too has dinosaurs… it’s just not Jurassic Park.

 

As it stands there are now two areas in the Jurassic Park area that currently have nothing in them. One by the Discovery Center, and the other is the entire rest of what used to be the Trike Encounter.

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While the area by the Discovery Center is seemingly small, it is feasible that something could indeed fit down there.  And where the Trike Encounter was is indeed large enough to fit something new.

I admit though that it becomes disheartening when seemingly everything else gets the attention you wish your favorite properties did. Universal Orlando is opening their Jimmy Fallon ride, Volcano Bay this summer, and their currently constructing their Fast and Furious ride. They’re also set to build and open their Nintendo Land  by 2020, and there are rumors of even more in store for Harry Potter, not to mention they also  purchased 450 acres of land to build on recently. That is all well and good, but what about Jurassic Park? When, if ever, will we see anything new?  That’s the question. I honestly think it would be unwise of Universal not to have something planned or be currently planning something. While I praise the work that Universal Creative does all around, and am thankful for the experience we already have- when compared to what Universal Japan has been doing, I don’t understand why we don’t have that here in the states.

Take a look at what is at Jurassic Park Japan:

 

 

 

The Raptor Encounter is hella cool, don’t get me wrong. I’m glad we have that! But why stop there?  I am sure the reason we don’t have these things boils down to costs, but the question I reiterate is- obviously Jurassic Park has pull, so why doesn’t Universal exploit that more? The movies make ridiculous amounts of money, and the current Jurassic World traveling exhibit is doing real well! So why such an absence of anything new at the parks? Even if it’s little things like trying to fit a mold of a trike from the closed encounter on the

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Art by Joshua Malone, inspired by new research on psittacosaur and their appearance in the Jurassic Park River Adventure 

Ride as an easter egg, or updating the look of the Psittacosaurus , or having a special screening event, or… well, anything?

 

 

In 2018 we have “Jurassic World 2” on the way, and Universal just recently announced they are re-releasing Jurassic Park once again next year in honor of it’s 25th anniversary. I’ll be really curious if Universal will announce something this year or next to coincide with that films release.  And Jurassic World gave Universal a TON to play with. Don’t tell me you wouldn’t enjoy a gyrosphere ride through a jungle filled with dinosaurs! I’ve also heard a rumor that Universal has considered closing their current Jurassic Park area and opening a new one/Jurassic World area on a part of their new 450 acres.

I’m also really interested in the future of the River Adventure. It needs some major work, and these yearly referbs I feel like just aren’t getting the job fully done. It’s still an amazing ride, don’t get me wrong. I will love it until the day I die; not to be too cheesy but it’s special to me (as is Universal in general.) But something obviously needs to be done with it to fix it. Universal has spent so much time and effort in to creating this immersive world for you to experience at their parks, and when you’re on a ride where the animatronics flake out halfway through their routine… it ruins the illusion. At the Hollywood ride the car doesn’t even fall anymore.  I would love to see these rides restored to their full glory, but also acknowledge that for something like that to happen they would a.) have to be closed for a while and b.) Universal would have to feel like they’re getting out what they’re putting in.

 

The love for dinosaurs is… ahem, universal. I think the recent success of Jurassic World (despite if people think it is a good movie or not) proves that the franchise still has life in it yet, and that the general public craves more. Universal has a great opportunity here to take this franchise and run with it again- the ball is in their court. When I look at classic promotional videos like this:

It makes me incredibly nostalgic and giddy. They put so much care and pride into these rides/parks originally and I would love to see that come back.

 

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Jurassic World

Excerpt from:

Jurassic Court: Inside the Proceedings of the Jurassic World Incident

By Michael Winston

A little over two decades ago John Hammond sat in the very same courtroom in San Diego that Claire Dearing, the now former Jurassic World Senior Assets and Operations Manager, sits- under very similar circumstances.  As the proceedings began the room was painfully still and quiet. Everyone was tense, especially Ms. Dearing.

A year and a half ago on the island of Isla Nublar an animal we now know to be the Indominus rex (a new carnivorous dinosaur which was set to be an upcoming new attraction to the park at the time) had broken out of its enclosure. In doing so several employees of the park were killed as it began its rampage across the island towards the main resort. The creature also broke through and subsequently caused the release of several other species of animals on the island, including the park’s aviary which released Jurassic World’s dangerous pterosaurs upon visitors. The parks guests and most of the staff had little to no warning and no means of escape, and subsequently many were injured or worse. It wasn’t until darkness had begun to fall on the island before the first ferry arrived on the island to take people away from the nightmare to a medical center on the mainland.

While there are many more factors and individuals involved, Ms. Dearing has come under intense fire of her handling of the situation. “It was a very unforeseeable accident,” she had said last month before a preliminary hearing. “Nobody could have guessed what was going to happen, and it was very unfortunate.” She then went on to say that while certain strategies could have been followed through better to ensure guest safety, she claimed that she had done all she possibly could.

Many are saying that it was not enough, especially after word got out that after the initial breakout of the Indominus she had ordered all of the rides and attractions north of the resort closed, but then quickly disappeared from her post leaving it to her subordinates to take control of the situation.

“She just left her staff high and dry, and ran off,” said head prosecution lawyer Bob Morris. There have been claims that Dearing was actually off with park staff member Owen Grady, attempting to rescue her two nephews that were also present on the island the day of the incident. “Look,” continued Morris, “she had a job to do and she failed to do it. Her incompetence led to the death and injuries of thousands. The creature should have never broken out of its paddock, people should have been evacuated earlier- it’s just as simple as that. She dragged her feet and then left the situation for others to handle. It’s inexcusable.”

A long year and a half of stipulation, scrutiny, and investigations over Ms. Dearing’s performance on the island resort of Jurassic World are finally coming to a head, and while this may not answer all of the burning questions about what happened, in the coming weeks there are bound to be at least a few answers.

“Jurassic Park”, “The Lost World: Jurassic Park”, “Jurassic Park ///”, “Jurassic World” are Trademarks of Universal Studios, Legendary Pictures, and Amblin Entertainment.

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Jurassic World: One Year Later

By Michael Winston

 

 

A year ago Jurassic World, a five star tourist destination that saw nearly 8 million people annually, fell in to chaos. Survivor Sally Benton remembers the event clearly, as if watching a movie.

“They just came down on us. A huge… flock of them, straight at us.”

It’s been a year since the devastating events that took place on Isla Nublar, and thousands of families are still feeling the effects.

“Every day,” says Sally, tears in her eyes. “We’re reminded every day, because he’s no longer with us.” As she referred to her husband and father of two Robert Benton, whose life ended protecting his young daughter from one of Jurassic World’s escaped animals.

Specific details are still sparse, but from press releases and insider information from various individuals a picture has begun to emerge.  At some point in the late morning of the day of the incident a large carnivorous dinosaur of some kind had escaped its paddock, causing the death of several Jurassic World employees. Many have speculated that this animal was the previously announced Indominus rex, a new attraction that was set to open in June of 2015, although no official confirmation has been made by Masrani Global or International Genetic Technologies (InGen) representatives.  The animal then proceeded to cross the island, unbeknown to many of the park guests. At some point in the afternoon the creature broke in to the park aviary where subsequently hundreds of animals known as pterosaurs escaped and owner of Jurassic World Simon Masrani died. The pterosaurs then flew towards the main resort area causing havoc, injuring and killing hundreds of visitors. All the while the unknown carnivore continued its rampage across the island breaking through several enclosures allowing for other types of dinosaurs to be released.  Park visitors sought refuge as the Animal Control Unit and InGen Security Division attempted to subdue the escaped animals and get a handle on the situation. It wouldn’t be until late that night before the ships would come to take the gathered survivors back to the mainland.

There were approximately 22,216 visitors on the island of Isla Nublar that day, as well as the parks several thousand regular staff members.  Hours after the primary evacuation a secondary rescue team was sent to Isla Nublar to retrieve any remaining survivors they could find. About a hundred people are, to this day, still unaccounted for and presumed dead.

“It’s not giving up hope, it’s just being realistic,” Michelle Cruz said whose father, Danilo Cruz, was an employee of Jurassic World. Danilo has been missing since the evacuation. “If they haven’t found him by now it’s unlikely that they ever will.”

Since the incident InGen and military taskforces have been present on the island. The UN held an emergency meeting shortly after the event last year, deciding the immediate control of the island. Newly appointed CEO of Masrani Global Edward Regis pleaded to let the InGen Security Division help with the recapture of escaped animals and search for missing people on Isla Nublar.

“We have an obligation to make sure that this incident remained contained to that island,” Mr. Regis said when asked for a comment after the UN meeting. “It is our responsibility, and we must do our share.  Our first priority obviously is to continue searching for remaining survivors. But we also need to makes sure that we do not have a repeat of what happened in 1997 or 2001.” Mr. Regis obviously is referring to the ’97 incident in which InGen, at the time with now late Peter Ludlow as CEO, brought a Tyrannosaurus rex to the mainland in hopes of opening a Jurassic Park destination in San Diego, as well as the 2001 incident following the rescue of Dr. Allan Grant, his assistant William Brennan, and the Kirby family when a trio of Pteranodons escaped the island of Isla Sorna.

On top of the extra security around Isla Nublar, security has increased around the island chain known as Las Cinco Muertes (“The Five Deaths”,) most notably around Isla Sorna which was the main manufacturing center for the original Jurassic Park as well as Jurassic World.

Outside of the rescue and maintenance teams though the UN has ordered to cease all other activity on the islands. The future of InGen and Masrani Global has also been called in to question. Masrani Global, while continuing their other operations in telecom and oil is no doubt feeling the heat, as stocks have drastically dropped. InGen’s security division has been the target some major scrutiny because of their poor management of the incident on Isla Nublar. Certain individuals, as well, are being closely investigated. Among those are Jurassic World’s Senior Assets Manager and Park Operations Director Claire Dearing.

“Why wasn’t the park shut down, and an evacuation ordered sooner?” asks a Jurassic World survivor who wished to remain anonymous. “If there was a breakout the evacuation should have happened immediately.”

“I’m sure Ms. Dearing did everything she could.” Mr. Edward Regis says in defense of the Operation Director’s actions. “In the coming months I’m sure the evidence will state as much. This was very unfortunate accident and our prayers and thoughts are still with the victims and their families.”

Claire Dearing was unavailable for comment.

The future of the “assets” themselves raises some questions as well. Today we find ourselves, essentially, in the same place we were before Simon Masrani obtained InGen and the islands from the late John P. Hammond. We have two islands with genetically recreated prehistoric animals, amongst other things. A trusted source from inside InGen gave details that Dr. Henry Wu, the lead geneticist of InGen (who too has been missing since the incident last year, and is presumed dead) was having his teams work on many more side projects other than just assets, and InGen is also known for creating new technology. All of these projects and undocumented/unreleased technology are sitting in a proverbial limbo at the moment, and what happens to them is unknown.

“And let’s not forget,” says University of California, Berkley professor Dr. Richard Levine, “the hundreds of fossil specimens they’ve collected. InGen had their own private paleontology teams and house the specimens they find somewhere. How many rare specimens do they have or even holotypes? Species and specimens that they have simply not published on. They also had twenty different living prehistoric species on Nublar alone, and we know from past instances that they have many others. What’s going to happen to them, and these fossils?”

Dr. Levine has been one of a few scientists who are petitioning to have the fossils as well as all data on the recreated animals to be made public, something that Dr. Wu and InGen never allowed.

More details about what specifically happened on Isla Nublar are bound to come into the light during the coming months, as official trials are set to begin in October. These trials will help determine the future of Masrani Global, InGen, and the individuals involved, as well as how the assets and islands are dealt with, along with the lawsuits from thousands of victims.

Regardless of the outcome of the trials it is unlikely that the gates of Jurassic World will ever be open to the public again. An incident that eerily echoed events that took place on the same island twenty two years before hand may finally be the end of a once great empire.

 

 

 

“Jurassic Park”, “The Lost World: Jurassic Park”, “Jurassic Park ///”, “Jurassic World” are Trademarks of Universal Studios, Legendary Pictures, and Amblin Entertainment.

Based off Characters Created by Michael Crichton and Scott Ciencin.

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1by ELIZABETH GELMAN /AP

Guests to the Jurassic World theme park were evacuated late Friday night after many of the parks animals suddenly escaped from their enclosures.

While it’s only been a few days since the horrific incident at the five star resort, the lawsuits are already accumulating quickly. Most of the park was successfully evacuated, but unfortunately not before several hundred of the guests were injured, or killed. Many guests are still missing, and the death toll is still being counted. Among those dead is Jurassic World owner Simon Masrani, who was killed in a helicopter crash while trying to contain one of the escaped “assets.”

“This is a horrific event,” stated Masrani Global Vice President Edward Regis. “We are doing everything in our power to offer aid to our visitors and to get this situation under control.”

Many of the evacuated guests and staff are still being held in Costa Rica for questioning and evaluations but should be released in the next few days.

The official comment from Masrani Global regarding the escape of the animals was “it’s under investigation.” However, some guests claim to have heard rumors of a large predator of some kind being the cause.

“I saw it,” said Jurassic World guest Ed James. “Some freaky thing, I can’t describe it. But I was on the monorail back to hotel and I saw this big  creature crash into the aviary and soon after the pterodactyls or whatever just started flying out of the dome. They attacked a helicopter, and then started flocking towards the park. It was chaos.”

While Masrani Global seems to be keeping face about wanting to get the situation under control and the park running again, stocks are already beginning to drop. Since Saturday stock in the company has dropped from 139.18 to 78.25, and guests who have pre-purchased tickets are demanding refunds. It’s a trend seen before by the company, and what led to InGen filing for Chapter 11 in 1997 after the incident in San Diego involving an escaped Tyrannosaurus rex.

“I just don’t know how this happened,” park guest Deborah Holland said, nursing a broken arm. “How could they let this happen? After what happened before, you’d think they would have known better and been able to prevent a catastrophe like this.”

We’ll keep you updated on Jurassic World news as it comes in, including the upcoming U.N. meeting regarding the incident.

“Jurassic Park”, “The Lost World: Jurassic Park”, “Jurassic Park ///”, “Jurassic World” are Trademarks of Universal Studios, Legendary Pictures, and Amblin Entertainment.

Based off Characters Created by Michael Crichton and Scott Ciencin.

                                                                      Universal Pictures

I’ve now seen Jurassic World three times, and have enjoyed it every time. It’s a fun thrill ride of a film, and now is the film with the second highest grossing weekend at the box office of all time!  While I really enjoyed the film and think it’s a great addition to the franchise, there are some thoughts and questions that have been keeping me up at night that I had along the way while watching it.  I thought that maybe I’d highlight a few of them here.

1.) The opening is awesome and a nice homage to Alien I feel… but I really would have liked a flashback for the opening instead I think. All of the JP films have great prologues and I feel like it would have been cool to see some of the post-1993 incident clean up or even the recapture of the rex or something.

2.) The bird in snow shot is wonderful, and is actually the only reference we get to the dino-bird relationship in the whole film.

3.) Okay, JW is open and it looks spectacular- everything I would want and expect in a Jurassic Park. But why? I mean, know why because I followed the online marketing but it’s not actually explained in depth in the film past John Hammond willing JP to Masrani. Last time we saw Hammond he had gone from “capitalist to naturalist” and was more concerned about protecting the animals. Now he thinks the park is a good idea again? Also… after all the incidents and deaths of the three previous films combined, how did they actually convince anybody that this would be a good idea again?

4.) The I. rex introduction is amazingly perfect.

5.) The innovation center is breathtaking. It’s like the Discovery Center at Islands of Adventure on digital roids.

6.) I actually don’t mind the raptor training at all… but why breed them in the first place. Even if they are for this military experiment who thought it was a good idea to take the most dangerous, human hating animals created at JP? The animals that are responsible for the most deaths in the series, and try and train them. Did anybody think that maybe, for once, you shouldn’t breed raptors?

7.) Why is the rex CGI? Also, I wish I could have seen more Jurassic World carnivores in captivity other than the  rex (albeit briefly,) and raptors.

8.) I feel like it’s now a statistic for kids of divorcees to end up on Isla Nublar or Isla Sorna. That should be in an ad: “Our park is sure to make your kids forget about your separation, because they’ll be too busy running from dinosaurs!”

9.) Speaking of Sorna… what the hell happened to it? They are acting, once again, like Nublar is the factory floor (like they did in the original film.) Is there nothing going on on Sorna? Or is it just so overrun by dinosaurs that they were like “screw it, we only need the one island” ?

10.) Zach is probably a bigger dick than any other human villain in the JP series.

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11.) Mosa is awesome. Period.

12.) We really haven’t seen all of I. rex yet so when her actual reveal happens I really would have wished they did more of the JP rex full reveal and roar from the first film rather than I.rex suddenly blocking Owen’s escape and we only see half of her. It’s like they can’t decide if they want to show us I. rex or not.

13.) Why not have a access door at… both side of the paddock for people?

14.) The moment where I. rex searching for grady is super suspenseful and well done. Plus the I. rex looks beautiful.

15.) Petting zoo is cute and the riding of the baby trike is a nice reference to a cut scene from the first film and the novel.

16.) I’s so glad Wu is back. All of his scenes in this film are gold- mainly because it follows his character from the novel to a T.

17.) I’m already kind of “done” with the amount of comedy in the film. It’s just a personal thing, although I realize that they need to offset the amount of violence in the film. But does every film have to be so “funny” now? Age of Ultron had the same issues. I get some of it, but a lot is unneeded and out of character for some. It makes me really happy they cut the poop scene with Claire later.

18.) The moment when Claire walks in to control and everyone is quiet is awesome. Wish there were more moments like that in the film. It’s really effective.

19.) The I. rex coming out of hiding via camo is one of the most amazing things I have seen in the JP series, and something I’ve been waiting for since Crichton’s The Lost World. Also, the moment it takes out the ACU unit is a great nod to Aliens.

20.) Also, love the blood on the wrist. “Which way is the drop going to roll off?”

21.) Yay! Fallon mention’s dilophosaurs! So… wait, they’re in Jurassic World? Why haven’t we seen them yet!?

22.) The gyrosphere ride is awesome, and leads to a great “It’s a dinosaur” scene.

23.) Why are the stegos nearly dragging their tails here but weren’t earlier on when they were at the river?

24.) I’m going to assumed I. rex broke the gate open that the boys enter the restricted zone through… but if so, why is the I. rex still in the jungle and not rampaging through the valley yet towards the park?

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25.) The I. rex looking at the boys ala JP rex style should have been a practical effect…

26.) Dying apatosaur scene is a near tearjerker. It’s seriously right up there with the sick trike from JP.

27.) Old park scene(s) = BEST moments in the whole film. Just wish we could have stayed there longer. How did the boys end up here anyway? Also… why is the norther side of the island “restricted” if it seems like any ol’ JW employee can trounce around there at any time? Are there supposed to be wild dinosaurs around? What haven’t we seen any? And if so is that what killed the JW worker whose helmet Gray finds, or was that supposed to be I. rex again?

28.) AH! Pterosaur beak killing ACU. GREAT reference to he cut final sequence of The Lost World.

29.)  Masrani dies and it’s sad… but still would have liked to had more time to get to know him. It’s not as sad as if, say, Hammond was to have died in the first film. Also… the trailers totally ruined it.

20.)Why do the pteros look so different… again?

21.) Jesus, what are these pteros MADE OF!?

22.) I can deal with almost everything these pteros can do except for it lifting a baby trike off the ground. Cool shot but… no.

23.) The pteros diving through the water is actually probably one of the coolest things they do in the film.

24.) Zara’s death is OVERKILL. Man, I mean she wasn’t a horrible person. Also the mosa’s appearance seems kind of the same as the one we’ve gotten before.

25.) Why are Owen and Claire kissing? Pteros… still flapping around everywhere. Not really the time or place.

26.) You’re going to tell me they tranquilized all the pterosaurs? All of them?

27.) It gets dark fast in Jurassic World.

28.) Really wanted Claire to either punch Hoskins instead or after Owen.

29.) Raptors turning on humans is probably one of the best moments in the whole film. It’s scary and is a really great mixture of the tall grass scene and Muldoon’s death. Also a little bit of Aliens thrown in again.

30.) YEAH, ROCKET LAUNCHER! Just like the novel. Man, I’m loving all these small nods to Crichton’s work.

31.) Okay, so Wu is cool using dinos for military. He wants to innovate because God complex. I get it. But damn it, now we’re going to be wondering what happens with those embryos now.

32.) Still… no BioSyn.

33.) Really Hoskins wasn’t a bad guy, he just makes some seriously bad judgement calls and is a dick. His intentions are good though. … … Still loved his death though.

34.) You know… we never do find out everything that is in I. Rex.

35.) YAY! DILOPHOSAURUS!!!

36.) Blue siding with Owen all of a sudden reminds me of Hiccup and Toothless…

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37.) Rexy emerging from the darkness is AWESOME AS HELL.

38.) Epic final fight is epic. Although they missed a chance to have it in the rain.

39.) Pretty sure Colin Trevorrow, when shooting the last scene, had a Spielberg JP moment and said “I think the star of  this movie is the mosasaur” then threw it in as the one being heroic and killing I. rex. Because… let’s be honest. Rexy and Blue were gonna have their hides handed to them.

40.) Okay, totally get animals teaming up to take out a common threat- okay. But I really REALLY think the rex should have roared/chased Blue away instead of having that “good job bro” look at each other. I mean, at one point Blue uses Rexy as a springboard to pounce on the I. rex. That means her claws dug into Rexy’s back… I’d be pissed. Those claws are sharp- as the scars on Rexy’s neck can attest to. Her chasing Blue away would have saved us that Owen nod to Blue as well…

41.) Also unless you saw the scars and put two and two together and/or followed the marketing for the film you would totally not realize that this was the same rex from the first film. There should have been a scene explaining it or showing her recapture. Also, wish more of her was practical effects instead of CG.

42.) I really don’t like the love story. At least I don’t like a lot of the moments that involve it. I would have much rather Owen and Claire looked at each other like Ellie and Alan do in the end of JP that the whole “for survival” bit.

43.) Yeah, I see some straggling pteranodons. Who’s gonna keep them from getting off the island? Also… once again, unless you follow the marketing for the film you wouldn’t know what happened to the pteros at the end of JP3.

44.) Epic emotional final shot is epic and really emotional.

The park is open! Run, to go see Jurassic World in cinemas now!

Universal Pictures

GrantTIME copy

A Dying Breed: The Modern World of Paleontology

Michael Bowman

Issue published June 10th, 2010

Dr. Alan Grant is no stranger to dire circumstances, yet the ones he faces now are unlike anything he’s ever encountered.  This week TIME catches up with the world renowned paleontologist who has been recently been forced to adapt his studies and research of prehistoric life in response to a present day issue: Jurassic World.  “Funding, and public interest has always been an issue. But with the resurrection of prehistoric life, the science of paleontology is fading in the public interest,” he told us, when we sat down with him at his Montana State University office.

While Jurassic World itself, located on the island of Isla Nublar, is thriving (receiving nearly twenty thousand guests a day) it has proved problematic for many scientists in Grant’s field- something that he himself knew was coming when he first stepped foot on the island in 1993.

“Even if the animals on the islands aren’t real dinosaurs,” Grant continued, “the public doesn’t care. It’s the closest thing they’ll ever get and that’s good enough for them. I’m not trying to be cynical, really. I’m trying to be honest. And the truth is, people don’t care if they are seeing the real thing, otherwise they would be flooding our museums.  You can go over to ours right now and see that is simply not the case.”
Statistics reflect this. The Museum of the Rockies (MOR,) along with many others worldwide that showcase Mesozoic life, have been hurting since the opening of Jurassic World. From 2005 to 2007 museum attendance at MOR has declined nearly 20%.  In 2009, this attendance decreased to 44%, and is still steadily declining. Nearly twenty museums in the United States alone have closed their doors since 2005, with their collections being donated, sold, or split up. However, even with this severe decline, several museums are actually gaining support by the Masrani Corporation and have chosen to implement interactive learning exhibits.

“Some museums, now,” Grant stated, “are starting to team up with Masrani Global, and InGen.  They’ve created these interactive exhibits and displays that let guests compare what they see in the museums to the animals on the islands. They are… technologically pretty advanced, I guess, but not something I want coming here personally. Even though the final choice is more so up to the board I have my qualms with it. See, it’s the same problem we keep coming back to; the creatures InGen made aren’t real dinosaurs. I want people to be able to see the real discoveries, and not the genetically modified creatures that only somewhat mirror reality.”

Dr. Grant ventured to John Hammond’s original Jurassic Park on Nublar in 1993 as a paleontology consultant, and was present during the now infamous incident that happened there. Years later, in 2001, he was kidnapped and taken to Isla Sorna- another InGen island inhabited by the genetically engineered dinosaurs.  Details concerning the incident were kept out of the public eye by the Masrani Corporation and U.N., with the subsequent hearings also being held behind closed doors.

In late 1997, the Masrani Corporation bought out International Genetic Technologies (InGen) shortly after the death of John Hammond, founder and CEO of InGen. Construction began on Isla Nublar for Jurassic World in 2002, which was later opened to the public in 2005.

“If that’s what people want to see, so be it. It’s profitable, no doubt about it. But that’s not what I want to see. It’s not what many others in this profession want to see either. There are many of us still fighting to get funding and attention for the real research of prehistoric life. You can “bring” back these creatures, and try and recreate the past but it will never be the past. It’s the present. There are still so many unanswered questions about Earth’s history that we can try to answer through paleontology. But to do so you need funding, and right now that’s becoming very hard to come by. It was difficult before Jurassic World, and it’s even more so now. Especially for us ‘purists.’”
Grant is referring here to the fact that paleontology is split into two main fractions. Purists being those paleontologists, like Grant, who are driven by a scientific search for knowledge. They look for and study clues from the past to answer questions about our future and the evolution of life on Earth. In contrast, there are also paleontologists who are solely in the field for the business aspect. For as many purists, there are now nearly triple the amount of “business paleontologists,” individuals, or groups who excavate mainly for the purpose to resell, to profit. While the Bureau of Land Management controls state land, these wealth-driven paleontologists buy up private land or strike deals with landowners for permission to excavate. The fossils collected are rarely published on before being sold off.
“It’s sad. There are incredible specimens being excavated on private land, then resold to collectors or even to Masrani Corp. Selling of fossils has always been an issue in the field, but now it’s a booming business. I’ve heard word that Masrani and other companies may start financing their own teams soon, instead of just piggybacking and funding others. If that happens we’ll have them on top of those already out there who hope to sell to them or competing companies.  It’s sad and getting to the point where it’s scary. Poaching is at an all-time high, and god forbid these groups ever find a new species. Some are already making off with rare specimens as it is. If they found a new species, it’d be given to the highest bidder, and lost to the science”

Grant goes on to say that some digs are now having to amp up security at their sites. This is in retaliation to the poaching that has been skyrocketing in recent years. “But you have to have money,” Grant states, “in order to afford them. It all comes back to the almighty dollar. Security is nice, but it’s expensive.”

For those digs currently funded by Masrani, InGen’s security division automatically sends out guards for the sites. Another nice perk for those well off groups. But for the institutions that rely solely on private funding and government grants, money for security can be hard,  if not impossible, to find.

“Since the opening of the park, there have been many ups and downs in the field of paleontology. Funding for proper research may be harder to find now, but my classes are full,” Grant joked. “I guess that has to account for something. I’ve been a part of it for so long that I guess I’ve grown accustomed to the ebb and flow of it all. That’s what life’s all about anyway, right? Evolving. Adapt or perish. The question is will the science of true paleontology ever bounce back from this, or will it all go by the wayside? If that happens I guess it’ll be ‘my time’ as they say. My breed of paleontologists will be extinct.”

Dr. Grant had few other words to offer on the subject of Jurassic Park, a topic he has tended to shy away from. He mentioned that he had received a private invite to the new parks fifth year anniversary celebration this upcoming weekend, but declined the offer.

“One visit to that island was enough. Besides, we just started our dig season and we think we have some pretty exciting specimens to excavate.”

“Jurassic Park”, “The Lost World: Jurassic Park”, “Jurassic Park ///”, “Jurassic World” are Trademarks of Universal Studios, Legendary Pictures, and Amblin Entertainment.

Based off Characters Created by Michael Crichton

Excerpt from the Memoirs of John Parker Hammond

Do you know what it feels like to create something; to create something that has never been seen before, by anyone? That magical feeling of seeing what you’ve only dreamt about until that moment? I remember the day clearly in my mind. I reached out and held her in my hand. My eyes watered behind my glasses as I tried to keep my composure. My hands shook mildly as I held the fragile creature in them. She breathed in volumes of air, having struggled to break through the egg for so long. Her eyes remained closed as she sniffed the air around her.

It was a tremendous feeling, unlike any I had ever felt before. Something so wondrous and magnificent that words escaped me. I stood there like a fool, mouth gaping, as I held her. I didn’t dare look up at Henry, or any of the others for fear that I might miss the slightest movement by the creature.

The raptor turned slightly in my hand, and I could feel her surprising weight for such a small creature. Her small claws dug into my gloved hands as I held her, making me all the more cautious. This, I had thought, this is what it was like to be God. I eventually did look up, to Wu, with a smile on my face.

“My boy, you’ve done it.”

Of course all of that had come to a screaming halt years later.  I mean screaming quite literally. Surely you must know the story by now. Jurassic Park and International Genetic Technologies; the debacle that took place miles off the coast of Costa Rica in the Pacific. We did our best to keep it under wraps, and for the longest time it was. Ian Malcolm tried to “blow the lid” off InGen’s cover stories several times, and who could blame the man. He had been wronged, along with many others. But he signed a nondisclosure agreement before he had ever gone to the island forbidding him to talk about anything that happened there. Dr.Grant, Dr. Sattler, and even my grandchildren had to sign the same papers. Even I, the CEO of InGen, was sworn to secrecy. All had gone to Hell during those few days in 1993.

       Or so it seemed.

InGen had a dirty secret: Isla Sorna, site B. The island was mere miles away from Nublar, and a part of a chain of islands the natives called “the Five Deaths.”  InGen bought this island chain from the Costa Rican government the same time we purchased Nublar, for just pennies when you calculate the total cost it spent to actually make Jurassic Park become a reality. Out of all the islands in the chain, Sorna, was the biggest, with the best conditions of any of the five. The only thing that proposed a problem was the strong surf that crashed against the cliff sides, but around the island there were several beaches and river openings, ideal for boathouses and docks. And so Isla Sorna was to be the base of operations for everything to come. Isla Sorna became, essentially, InGen’s base of operations for the Jurassic Park project. This is where we did the true, hard work. It was the research station, not the theme park. Most of the animals were bred here first, and then later shipped to Nublar.

But, as if by an act of God, only a few months after the tragic incident that happened at Jurassic Park, hurricane Clarissa wiped out our facilities on Site B. Crew and staff were forced to evacuate immediately. All productivity ceased, and the animals eventually escaped their containment. A year later, in 1994, teams were sent to Sorna and Nublar to the extract files that had been left behind. On Nublar they were told destroy what they could, to keep as much as possible from the public eye. Some of the facilities were dismantled, vehicles and technological equipment sold for scrap. All that was taken away was basic files for records, building plans, blueprints, and maps. Thousands upon millions of dollars wasted, from building, then destroying, and paying people off to keep their mouths shut. Millions of dollars wasted in their attempts to bring back the most magnificent animals the world had ever known. As fast as dinosaurs had reappeared on this earth, they were wiped away by the very people who created them.

And for a while that was it. I retreated into solitude for some time after that, and suffered a stroke in the middle of 1996. After that, control over InGen began to slip from my grasp as my nephew Peter Ludlow took control. He preached  to our board that it would be possible to save our company from bankruptcy by “harvesting our assets” on Isla Sorna, something that at that time I was dead set against doing. I would have loved nothing more than to see my dreams come to fruition. But I knew that it would only remain just that, a dream. These poor animals, I felt, needed to be left alone. But I can’t blame the board for not seeing things that way. We were in trouble. Eventually the board relented and gave Peter total control over the company behind my back.

The rest, as they say, is history.  Because of what happened in 1997 the public now knows everything about Jurassic Park. Peter sent out his little camping trip, leading to the deaths of even more innocent people, and then there was the subsequent San Diego attack. Peter isn’t the only one at fault here. I had my own hand in this game at the time. Unlike Peter, though, who was set on extracting the dinosaurs, I thought that if I could simply document them I could rally public opinion to preserve them in their island habitat. That’s no excuse though. People died and I was just as guilty as anybody else, maybe even more so. My hands were stained.

InGen may as well have set fire to whatever money we had left. And none of us could leave. Every member of the board wanted to resign but clauses in their contracts kept them from doing so. And besides, nobody was going to want to hire them; nobody wanted to hire anyone from “the company of death.”

Competitors, like BioSyn, were poised and eagerly awaiting for InGen to fall into Chapter eleven, which we did. If there was ever a counter to the high I felt holding that first baby Velociraptor, it was the disgrace I felt when the final court hearing was over. Bankruptcy.  I had walked from the courtroom with my head held high, indignant with false pride that masked the horror and feelings of failure I truly felt. When I returned to the InGen headquarters phones were ringing off the hook, cubicles were emptied, and papers scattered across the floor. I stared in disbelief, before retreating to my private office, and wept.

* * *

 The following is an account of the events that took place after the death of J.P. Hammond, written by InGen’s 1997 C.E.O Edward D. Regis.

For latter part of 1997 Mr. Hammond’s health continued to decline, until he passed away in October. At the time InGen was at the center of a perpetual bidding war until we were finally bought out in December of that year.

I sat in my office, staring at a wall blindly. The office was littered with Christmas decorations, although I don’t think anyone was particularly festive that year. That was until a sharply dressed young Indian man with a folder and briefcase walked in. I knew exactly who he was. We shook hands after he entered my office, but I didn’t smile. He remained kind and polite though. Sitting across from me with a smile, he told me his vision for InGen. It started off very subtle. He extracted papers from the folder in his hand. The papers were littered with numbers, data, and lists. Everything he had in store for InGen regarding advancements in technology, and how there would be joint ventures with other sections in his company. How InGen could be used to jump start other projects around the world, and eventually I cut him off.

“Get to it,” I said sharply. “This isn’t why you bought my company.”

“You’re right, Mr. Regis, but all of this is just as important. It’s where we will make our money to rebuild.”

“Rebuild?” I asked flatly.

And that’s when he lifted another folder from his briefcase and slid it towards me. I opened it and stared at the contents in disbelief. One by one I removed the papers and plans, laying them out on my desk. I couldn’t believe it. It was all there, right in front of me. Not a single thing had been left out.

“But-”

“And I have already, for months now actually, been talking with your chief geneticist, Henry Wu. He’s been waiting for a second chance. He believes he can perfect the process this time, Mr. Regis, and even go beyond what InGen ever dreamed was possible. What John dreamed was possible.”

I looked up at the man, dumbstruck.

“Ed,” Simon Masrani said. “We can fix it.”

I looked back down at the papers, and knew that it was actually possible. Masrani spent the next hour and a half making a presentation with such showmanship that would have made even Mr. Hammond proud. And by the end, I knew. I knew we could do it again, and this time it could be a success. It almost worked last time. This time, though, it’ll be better. This time it’ll be flawless.

“Jurassic Park”, “The Lost World: Jurassic Park”, “Jurassic Park ///”, “Jurassic World” are Trademarks of Universal Studios, Legendary Pictures, and Amblin Entertainment.

Based off Characters Created by Michael Crichton

Many people know of my love for this series. Some day I’ll write some long, epic post about my detailed history with Jurassic Park. Someday we’ll tread down my “petticoat lane.” But not today. Today, right now, I’m going to focus on the above trailer; the future of the series.

Boy does it look bright.

I’ve probably watched the trailer, no joke, around twenty times so far. I’ve had many friends ask me about my thoughs, which is my main reason for writing this post.

I literally cannot tell you how excited I am. First, last week, the Masrani Global site launched along with the official Jurassic World site. Masarani Global is one of the best viral marketing sites I have ever seen- tightly answering several questions fans have had while also connecting it all back to the previous films while also throwing some nods to the original novels and even TellTale’s JP game as well. It’s an amazing site, and if you haven’t checked it out you must do so right away. And this past Sunday an actual “teaser” for the trailer came out that really got my heart racing. For the first time we were seeing official JW footage. It was finally feeling real to me- this film was going to be a thing. I knew it was for a year now. But I was actually seeing it. And I was excited.

And while the promised date for the trailer release wasn’t supposed to be until Thursday night (what I dubbed as #Jurassicgiving, it dropped today in the afternoon for reasons that director Colin Trevorrow tweeted saying were “out of his control.” I don’t know what those reasons were, and I don’t care. I’m glad it’s here. Words can’t express how happy I am, or how excited I am. It calls back many classic Jurassic moment from the series while also adding something new.

Now there are a few things that I have to get out of the way. I have some small comments that I feel I have to say to clarify some doubts others have.

One of the biggest complaints is the raptors at the end.  There are some people flipping their lids over the fact that the trailer seems to show “tamed raptors” at the end, running alongside Chris Pratt’s character, Owen. First off, several people working on the film, have said that they are not “tame.” I personally think people need to calm down about it because not only do we not now what the context is in the film- it isn’t that outlandish of an idea I think.First off, earlier in the trailer we see a giant freaking mosasaur eating a shark ala SeaWorld/zoo style.

Universal Pictures

 That may not be “tamed” but that is a learned show trick for that animal. It learned to do that to get its food. Raptors are supposed to be the smartest dinosaurs made by InGen. It’s not outlandish that they could be trained, even remotely, to be used for tracking or something. In fact, to me, that makes them more like actual animals and less like the monsters the first three films have made them out to be. But in the end, once again, that may not even be what they are used for in the film. They may not be trained in any way, or could turn on Owen/humans, or something else! We have no clue, which is one of the coolest things about this trailer (which I will talk more about later.)

Secondly is the CGI. First, several scenes (or so I have heard/read) were only made for the trailer and will not be in the final film. So it doesn’t surprise me that maybe, on a few effects, they weren’t 100%. Secondly, post production and finally touches goes on until almost a few weeks before the film is shipped out for theatres. The films doesn’t come out until June 12th of next year everyone- there is still a LOT more rendering, and CG work that has yet to be done.

There are some people criticizing the science of the film, but I think only half of them are serious and the other half realize that JP is a creation of Hollywood and just roll with it and make a joke, like Thomas Holtz and Brian Switek. But others have really been outraged at how little “accuracy” there is to a lot of the dinosaurs. While science has been littered in and out of the series (there is def more in the novels) nobody should expect true science to come from JP film. They are fun science fiction film. Besides, with a lot of the inaccuracies many fans (including myself) have actually found explanations for them by analyzing the films/novels/games/etc. much like Trekkies do for Star Trek. But when all else fails, you can simply blame it on the frogs. I want a perfect, scientifically accurate dinosaur film too. I just will never expect that from a JP film.

So onwards and upwards.

 

The trailer not only brings a lot of new to the mix, but also recalls a lot of classic scenes and bits from the first three films as well as surprisingly throwing in a scene or two from the novels- which I’m not many people realize. While I love the whole nostalgic feeling of some of the call back moments in the trailer it’s the novel scenes that have amped the most because I personally think there are moments/plots in the novels that haven’t been used yet in the movies that would be awesome to finally see on film.

Universal Pictures

First off Chris Pratt’s scene where he is riding alongside a pack of raptors is NOT ONLY ONE OF THE COOLEST PART OF THE TRAILER, but an obvious refrence to a very identical scene in Chrichton’s The Lost World where Sarah Harding is riding a motorcycle trying to catch up to a pack of raptors.

Universal Pictures

Next is the jungle river scene. I really hope this leads to some great moments. The river section of the first novel near the end had some of the best moments in the whole book including a swimming tyrannosaur, a pair of dilophosaurs, pterosaurs attacking, and finally a waterfall where the rex was waiting for them at the bottom. Even if we don’t get ALL of that (hopefully we get some…) it’s nice to see this little nod to that portion of the novel. Plus… STEGOSAURS. OH MY GOD, STEGOSAURS. DO YOU SEE THOSE STEGOSAURS!?

….

Stegosaurs.

Also a few other moments that remind me of scenes in the novel:

-When the man is being dragged along in the jungle reminds me of the moment when Levine lands on Sorna with his guide in The Lost World and the guide is dragged off into the jungle by something unseen.

-The idea of “tamed dinosaurs” was actually in the first novel. Wu talks to Hammond about being able to alter the DNA of the dinosaurs to make them more “domesticated” or controlled. There is also the idea of making “dinosaur pets,” and altering different versions of dinosaurs to get the perfect animal.

Universal Pictures

The trailer, while showing you some of the species, does a real good job at hiding others. It keeps a real mystery about what the new hybrid dinosaur looks like exactly, but also about other events that happen in the film. It’s very reminiscent of how the first film’s trailer was done. You see glimpses of the dinosaurs here and there and a few full shots of dinosaurs but not much. The rest is only parts or cutaways which keeps the intrigue up. It’s a great trick, and I’m glad that they brought it back for this trailer instead of just showing us everything outright.

Another thing that isn’t shown is exactly what the large group of people are running from. From the way that shot is set up (this large, aerial view) makes me inclined to believe that they are running from a pterosaur of some kind instead of a dinosaur.

And speaking of non-dinosaurs, the other MASSIVE inclusion to the trailer (as well as the series) is that of prehistoric aquatic reptiles- specifically the mosasaur. Now in TellTale Game’s video game (which ties into the original film) there is a mosasaur, but we have never seen on in the actual films yet. So this is a big deal, and I’m super excited to finally see it. I expect there to be a few really good moment with this creature.

I could sit here and point out every single moment that seemed to wink/nod to the other films but a.)you have probably caught most of them, b.)it’d make this post much longer than it already is. I’ll point out a few, but what I will say in a broad sense is that while I’m glad Trevorrow picked up on a lot of these “little” moments and I think it’ll be nice to see them in the film I hope it isn’t done too often in the final product. I’m sure it won’t and that a majority of them were used for the trailer to get that nostalgia factor in there, but it’s just a faint worry I have. I don’t want to send the whole movie playing a matching game in my head with scenes/moment in JW matching up with scenes in the other three films.

Here are a few I want to point out:

-Bryce Dallas Howard’s “run” yell reminds me of Ellie Sattler’s call to Dr. Grant to run after her encounter with the raptor in the shed. In fact, her scream resembles Dern’s scream A LOT in this vintage JP marketing video (skip to 2:24, and it basically shows an alternate take.)

Howard’s character’s tank is even, essentially, the same color.

-The shot with the Gallimimus’ and the main gate, I feel, is almost the exact angle used in the first film.

-“You really think she climbed out?”

Like I said, there are many many more and if you want I can always point more out if you want (via comments, messages, etc.)

I am beyond excited, as I’ve stated before. Those last few moments of the trailer, with that haunting theme ending on that fogged logo… just sent chills up my spine.

I’ve been waiting thirteen years for this trailer, and it will end up being fourteen years since the last JP film once JW is released. I’m ready. What gets me even more excited is how well the trailer has been received, in general. It was all over the news feeds on major media outlets today, and everyone is talking about it. Soon the merch will be out, and the ball will really be at full speed towards June. This gets me excited for two reasons. 1.) I hope Universal really takes note of all of this, because I know for several years now it’s been rumored that a revamp of the JP area of IOA in Orlando could be planned. All this positive feedback from the trailer shows me that the public is still in love with Jurassic Park (as if the OVER two billion that the previous three films have collected wasn’t enough proof.) And 2.) the public still, and always will love dinosaurs. I hope that this film inspires a whole new generation of dinosaur lovers and future scientists, and the first one did me. I wouldn’t be the person I am today without the first JP.


The trailer is beautiful, nostalgic, and haunting. It does its job by satisfying with some awesome and exciting moments, as well as reeling you in by keeping you guessing at the new twists and turns director Colin Trevorrow and company will throw our way. I had an inkling, based on the teaser released Sunday, I was going to like this trailer. I just didn’t know exactly how much I’d like it. That’s chaos theory.

The park opens, June 12, 2014.

Universal Pictures